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Ticonderoga History


"Ticonderoga" is an Iriquois Indian word meaning "between the waters," referring to the land between Lakes Champlain and George. It is pronounced tie-kahn-dur-oh-ga. It was initially used by Europeans to name Fort Ticonderoga at the southern edge of Lake Champlain which separates New York from Vermont. The fort was originally under British control. In a surprise raid on May 10, 1775, Ethan Allen and his "Green Mountain Boys" captured the fort for the colonies during the American War of Independence. The ships are named after that battle.

There have been five ships named Ticonderoga in US history: the first was a gunship launched in 1814. She plied the waters of Lake Champlain until 1825. The second was a wooden-hulled, steam-powered sloop-of-war launched in 1862. She fought in battles against the Confederacy and was the first steam-powered ship to circumnavigate the world, from 1878 to 1881. The third was originally a German freighter impounded by the US in 1917. She was used as a transport ship. On September 30, 1918, she was torpedoed by the German submarine U152 and sunk. One hundred and thirteen Americans lost their lives.

However, it is the fourth and fifth Ticonderoga ships we commemorate here: the aircraft carrier CV/CVA/CVS 14 and the Aegis cruiser CG 47. Read more below.


CV-14 HISTORY CG-47 HISTORY

CVA-14 VIDEO MEDITERRANIAN-CRUISE

© USS Ticonderoga Veterans Association 2001-6 September, 2016

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